I went to install SQL Server 2008 on a Windows Server 2008 R2 box today for the first time and was greeted with the error “You must use the Role Management Tool to install or configure Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.”  The text of this error was basically about as decipherable as the voice of the adults in the old Peanuts cartoons, so I fired up my old friend Google to find out what to really do.  It seems that Windows Server 2008 R2 ships with .NET Framework 3.5.1 and in order to proceed, you need to go to Server Manager (that window that pops up when you login and stays unless you close it) and enable (really, install) the .NET Framework 3.5.1 and any prerequisites.

ss2008_error_1

 

ss2008_error_2

I have run into issues several times when I have had Remote Desktop Sessions (RDP) open to servers and my computer has had to reboot unexpectedly (either because of WSUS updates or because it has hung) and RDP won’t let me get to my existing session, it just creates a new one when I go to login.  This uses both available administrative RDP sessions on the server (see picture below) and makes it inaccessible to anyone else trying to access it through RDP, as well as keeping me from getting to the work I had in process in the previous session and any windows that I had open.

rdp_img1

So, in the case of this example, I already had an RDP connection established to CORPI at the time my computer rebooted (ID #1).  When my computer came back up, I went to login via RDP to CORPI and it created another session (ID #2).

After much research, I found a way that Windows will let you access an RDP session that you have already established.  It is a command run from the command line on the server, so you would go ahead and login as Session ID #2 and once logged in, do the following:

  1.  Click Start, Run and type in “cmd” to get to a command prompt

 rdp_img2

  1. At the command prompt, type in the following command, tscon 1 /v
    1. The tscon command is the Terminal Services connection command.
    2. The argument, 1, is the Session ID.  This should be changed to whatever Session ID that you want to connect to.  In this case, it was Session ID #1.
    3. The /v parameter tells the tscon command to display information about the commands that are being performed.

Once you hit enter, your current connection to the server will be disconnected (in the case of my example, above, that would be Session ID #2) and you are immediately reconnected to the Session ID# that you specified in the tscon command.

Once you hit enter, your current connection to the server will be disconnected (in the case of my example, above, that would be Session ID #2) and you are immediately reconnected to the Session ID# that you specified in the tscon command.

 

I was also going to add that if you want to RDP to a server and both connections are in use, you connect by typing the server name followed by a space /admin and connect to the console session.